built in stumps

Smoker Clones are your own version of a commercially available Smoker. Examples are Stumps, Jambo, Backwoods, or any other you want to try to copy.
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Gator
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built in stumps

Post by Gator » June 25th, 2015, 7:34 pm

Hi guys this is my first post but i've been following this forum for a while and guys i'm impressed. I am a brickmason by trade and a pretty fair welder. what i want to ask is if a guy took there double pan stumps clone and built it in to an outdoor kitchen would it work? what I'm saying is if I built the door and the gravity feed chute and the firebox would fire brick and about a foot of masonry be enough for the cooking chamber. I can build that out of firebrick and build the guides for the racks. Do ya'll think it will hold the heat needed to do the job effectivly . Thanks Gator



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Re: built in stumps

Post by Puff » June 25th, 2015, 9:12 pm

Hi Gator....

From what I am reading about the pizza oven I am planning for our outdoor area, it likely would. If additional insulation is needed you can surround it in vermiculite and either frame it in metal studs or more masonry. Keep in mind...I have not done it but I have read volumes of material on building it. Maybe some of the stuff out there will help guide you in the right direction.

I am guessing you would follow the gravity feed plan but construct it out of firebrick and some steel?


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Re: built in stumps

Post by Pete Mazz » June 26th, 2015, 7:31 am

I would guess it would take longer to heat up but would retain that heat much longer. Sounds like a cool project!


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Re: built in stumps

Post by Gator » June 26th, 2015, 3:09 pm

that's what I was wondering. my thinking is once the firebrick heat up they should hold the heat. I could if needed leave a 2" space between the firebrick and the other masonry to put in roxwool. Some people lay the firebrick on edge which makes them 2" thick I lay mine down flat making the wall a full 4". That way all I need to do for rack support is set the brick out an inch or so. Been thinking about this for a while but I will have some time to work on stuff in a few weeks and am going to order my plans then. Going to build a smoker as per the plans first and then should understand the workings of a gravity flow better.



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Re: built in stumps

Post by Puff » June 26th, 2015, 9:42 pm

Geez Gator, take a ride over and I'll show you the best demo ever. That heating time is something to question. Would the time to heat the chamber be considerable? It takes about 45-60 minutes for me to get a chimney of lump charcoal started, pour them into the chute glowing red, then fill the chute with more lump and open the valve and ash cleanout door getting the CC up to near 250. Once this is running, my smoke is truly thin blue smoke and I can close the ball valve down to 1/2 and keep it at 235-240 for as long as the chute is feeding fuel in.

The pizza oven at our friends house runs near 620 degrees but it really has thermal mass. The fire brick floor and inside dome seem to insulate well and your 2" gap sounds like it really would insulate well but I wonder how you would know if you needed to go that far.

I might suggest looking into those pizza oven setups as they have the heat thing down quite well. I THINK your original thought might be sufficient to do the job. Essentially a fuel chute and a door to access the cooking racks, the rest is only the mechanics of which material you use, brick or steel.


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